Stress and practical assessments

Clarke, Neil D. and Gardiner, Nick (2010) Stress and practical assessments. Investigations in university teaching and learning, 6 (2). pp. 158-163. ISSN 1740-5106

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Abstract

This paper explores the role of stress in practical assessments, which have long been used in an academic Sports Science and Sports Therapy setting. Practical exams have the potential to assess many aspects of both theory and practice. They are especially important for assessing a student’s competence in performance of a particular skill. In addition, practical exams are designed to recreate the stresses of a clinical environment (Rushforth, 2006). The practical exams for Sports Therapy also serve to satisfy the core competency requirements set by the course’s governing body, The Society of Sports Therapists. It is important to consider the build up of stress in a lead-up to an exam. The student needs to have enough experience and confidence in order to minimise anxiety and allow the demands of the situation to increase arousal and enable the student to perform at the best of their ability. But, how do we achieve the optimal level of stress?

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Investigations in university teaching and learning; practical assessments; stress; self-confidence; peer assessment; reflection; sports science education; sports therapy education
Subjects: 100 Philosophy & psychology > 150 Psychology
300 Social sciences > 370 Education
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
700 The arts; fine & decorative arts > 790 Recreational & performing arts
Department: School of Social Professions
Centre for Professional Education and Development (CPED)
Depositing User: Mary Burslem
Date Deposited: 14 Apr 2015 09:38
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2016 11:03
URI: http://repository.londonmet.ac.uk/id/eprint/306

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