A mixed methods process evaluation of a print-based intervention supported by internet tools to improve physical activity in UK cancer survivors

Webb, Justin, Peel, Jenna, Fife-Schaw, Chris and Ogden, Jane (2019) A mixed methods process evaluation of a print-based intervention supported by internet tools to improve physical activity in UK cancer survivors. Public Health, 175. pp. 19-27. ISSN 0033-3506

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Official URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/...

Abstract / Description

Objective
A waiting list randomised control trial has shown the Move More Pack, a print-based intervention supported by Internet tools, to improve physical activity levels in cancer survivors; however, one-third of them do not improve from the intervention. The objective of this process evaluation is to understand intervention use, the mechanisms of impact, the perceived benefits and the contextual factors influencing these, identifying for whom it is a useful resource.

Methods
The process evaluation used mixed methods, based on guidance from the UK Medical Research Council, including 181 questionnaire responses on intervention use and physical activity improvement over 12 weeks, 56 open-text responses and 17 semistructured interviews.

Results
The Move More Pack was suggested to be most useful when delivered towards the start of the cancer journey to those with a positive attitude to fight cancer but with a low level of physical activity, capitalising on a teachable moment. It was suggested that healthcare professionals could support the effective distribution of the Move More Pack. The intervention's printed components were more popular and well used than the Internet tools. Use of the printed intervention components was positively correlated with physical activity improvement but use of the Internet tools was not. Women were more likely to use the intervention's printed components than men. Cancer survivors using the intervention reflected that they had increased confidence and motivation for physical activity and other lifestyle behaviours.

Conclusion
The Move More Pack should be offered by healthcare professionals, during cancer treatment, when health is salient, to those with a positive attitude to fight cancer but with low levels of physical activity. Use of the intervention's printed components is more likely to improve physical activity than the Internet tools, and the components are more likely to be used by women. The use of Internet tools to support physical activity improvement in cancer survivors requires further investigation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: behaviour; cancer; physical activity; remote support
Subjects: 100 Philosophy & psychology > 150 Psychology
300 Social sciences > 360 Social problems & services; associations
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
Department: School of Social Professions
Depositing User: Justin Webb
Date Deposited: 02 Aug 2019 08:25
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2019 08:25
URI: http://repository.londonmet.ac.uk/id/eprint/5019

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