A randomised control trial and cost-consequence analysis to examine the effects of a print-based intervention supported by internet tools on the physical activity of UK cancer survivors

Webb, Justin, Fife-Schaw, Chris and Ogden, Jane (2019) A randomised control trial and cost-consequence analysis to examine the effects of a print-based intervention supported by internet tools on the physical activity of UK cancer survivors. Public Health, 171. pp. 106-115. ISSN 0033-3506

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Abstract / Description

Objective:
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a print-based intervention supported by Internet tools at improving physical activity in cancer survivors compared with a standard letter recommendation. Prediagnosis physical activity and self-efficacy were hypothesised to predict physical activity improvement.

Study design:
Waiting list randomised control trial and cost-consequence analysis.

Methods:
Adult cancer survivors who could become physically active without prior medical approval were randomised to receive either a print-based intervention supported by Internet tools (intervention, n - 104) or a standard letter recommendation (control, n - 103). Physical activity was assessed at 12 weeks with maintenance assessed at 24 weeks in the intervention arm. The number needed to treat was calculated, and a cost-consequence analysis completed.

Results:
Participants in receipt of a print-based intervention supported by Internet tools improved their physical activity by 36.9% over 12 weeks compared with 9.1% in the control arm. Physical activity was maintained at 24 weeks in the intervention arm. A total of 6.29 cancer survivors needed to receive the intervention for one cancer survivor to improve their physical activity over a standard letter recommendation. Intervention delivery cost
£8.19 per person. Prediagnosis physical activity and self-efficacy did not predict physical activity improvement.

Conclusion:
A print-based intervention supported by Internet tools offers a promising low-cost means to intervene to improve physical activity in cancer survivors.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: behaviour change; cancer; physical activity; remote support
Subjects: 100 Philosophy & psychology > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
Department: School of Social Professions
Depositing User: Justin Webb
Date Deposited: 24 May 2019 14:06
Last Modified: 14 Jun 2019 12:23
URI: http://repository.londonmet.ac.uk/id/eprint/4814

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