Why the processing of repeated targets are better than that of no repetition: evidence from easy-to-difficult and difficult-to-easy switching situations

Dong, Guangheng and Zhou, Hongli and Lin, Xiao and Hu, Yanbo and Lu, Qilin (2014) Why the processing of repeated targets are better than that of no repetition: evidence from easy-to-difficult and difficult-to-easy switching situations. Behavioral and brain functions, 10 (4). pp. 1-9. ISSN 1744-9081

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Abstract

Background:
Previous studies have found that the processing of repeated targets are easier than that of non-repetition. Although several theories attempt to explain this issue, the underlying mechanism still remains uncovered. In this study, we tried to address this issue by exploring the underlying brain responses during this process.

Methods:
Brain activities were recorded while thirty participants performing a Stroop task (Chinese version) in the MRI scanner. Using pseudo-random strategies, we created two types of switching conditions (easy-to-difficult; difficult-to-easy) and relevant repeating conditions.

Results:
The results show that, in difficult-to-easy switching situation, higher brain activations are found in left precuneus than repeating ones (the precuneus is thought related with attention demands). In easy-to-difficult switching conditions, higher brain activations are found in precuneus, superior temporal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus than repeating trials (most of these regions are thought related with executive function). No overlapping brain regions are observed in con_CON and incon_INCON conditions. Beta figures of the survived clusters in different conditions, correlations between brain activations and switch cost were calculated.

Conclusions:
The present study suggests that the feature that response time in switching trials are longer than that in repeating trials are caused by the extra endeavors engaged in the switching processes.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Switch cost, Priming effect, Switching situation, Repeating situation
Subjects: 100 Philosophy & psychology > 150 Psychology
Department: School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Yanbo Hu
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2018 10:28
Last Modified: 24 Jan 2018 10:28
URI: http://repository.londonmet.ac.uk/id/eprint/1329

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