Dysfunctional prefrontal function is associated with impulsivity in people with internet gaming disorder during a delay discounting task

Wang, Yifan, Hu, Yanbo, Xu, Jiaojing, Zhou, Hongli, Lin, Xiao, Du, Xiaoxia and Dong, Guangheng (2017) Dysfunctional prefrontal function is associated with impulsivity in people with internet gaming disorder during a delay discounting task. Frontiers in psychiatry, 8 (287). pp. 1-10. ISSN 1664-0640

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Abstract

Internet gaming disorder (IGD), defined as the persistent use of online games with ignorance of adverse consequences, has increasingly raised widespread public concerns. This study aimed at elucidating the precise mechanisms underlying IGD by comparing intertemporal decision-making process between 18 IGD participants and 21 matched healthy controls (HCs). Both behavioral and fMRI data were recorded from a delay discounting task. At the behavioral level, the IGD showed a higher discount rate k than HC; and in IGD group, both the reaction time (delay − immediate) and the discount rate k were significantly positively correlated with the severity of IGD. At the neural level, the IGD exhibited reduced brain activations in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and bilateral inferior frontal gyrus compared to HC during performing delay trials relative to immediate ones. Taken together, the results suggested that IGD showed deficits in making decisions and tended to pursuit immediate satisfaction. The underlying mechanism arises from the deficient ability in evaluating between delayed reward and immediate satisfaction, and the impaired ability in impulse inhibition, which may be associated with the dysfunction of the prefrontal activation. These might be the reason why IGD continue playing online games in spite of facing severe negative consequences.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: internet gaming disorder, decision-making, delay discounting task, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus
Subjects: 100 Philosophy & psychology > 150 Psychology
500 Natural Sciences and Mathematics > 570 Life sciences; biology
Department: School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Yanbo Hu
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2018 10:13
Last Modified: 24 Jan 2018 10:13
URI: http://repository.londonmet.ac.uk/id/eprint/1291

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