Meal replacement by formula diet reduces weight more than a lifestyle intervention alone in patients with overweight or obesity and accompanied cardiovascular risk factors—the ACOORH trial

Halle, Martin, Röhling, Martin, Banzer, Winfried, Braumann, Klaus-Michael, Kempf, Kerstin, McCarthy, H. David, Schaller, Nina, Predel, Hans Georg, Scholze, Jürgen, Führer-Sakel, Dagmar, Toplak, Hermann and Berg, Aloys (2020) Meal replacement by formula diet reduces weight more than a lifestyle intervention alone in patients with overweight or obesity and accompanied cardiovascular risk factors—the ACOORH trial. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. ISSN 0954-3007

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41430-020-00783-4

Abstract / Description

Background:
As formula diets have demonstrated to be effective in reducing weight, we hypothesised that in patients with overweight or obesity and accompanied cardiovascular risk factors, combining a liquid formula diet with a lifestyle intervention is superior in reducing weight and improving cardiovascular risk factors than lifestyle intervention alone.

Methods:
In this multicenter RCT 463 participants with overweight or obesity (BMI: 27–35 kg/m²; at least one additional comorbidity of the metabolic syndrome) were randomised (1:2) into either a control group with lifestyle intervention only (CON, n = 155) or a lifestyle intervention group including a liquid meal replacement (INT, n = 308). Both groups used telemonitoring devices (scales and pedometers), received information on healthy diet and were instructed to increase physical activity. Telemonitoring devices automatically transferred data into a personalised online portal and acquired data were discussed. INT obtained a liquid meal replacement substituting three meals/day (~1200 kcal) within the first week. During weeks 2–4, participants replaced two meals/day and during weeks 5–26 only one meal/day was substituted
(1300–1500 kcal/day). Follow-up was conducted after 52 weeks. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. Primary outcome was weight change. Secondary outcomes comprised changes in cardiometabolic risk factors including body composition and laboratory parameters.

Results:
From the starting cohort 360 (78%, INT: n = 244; CON: n = 116) and 317 (68%, INT: n = 216; CON: n = 101) participants completed the 26-weeks intervention phase and the 52-weeks follow-up. The estimated treatment difference (ETD) between both groups was −3.2 kg [−4.0; −2.5] (P < 0.001) after 12 weeks and −1.8 kg [−2.8; −0.8] (P < 0.001) after 52 weeks.

Conclusions:
A low-intensity lifestyle intervention combined with a liquid meal replacement is superior regarding weight reduction and improvement of cardiovascular risk factors than lifestyle intervention alone.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: nutrition; nutrition therapy; nutritional supplements; weight management
Subjects: 500 Natural Sciences and Mathematics > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
Department: School of Human Sciences
Depositing User: David Mccarthy
Date Deposited: 05 Nov 2020 09:13
Last Modified: 05 Nov 2020 09:13
URI: http://repository.londonmet.ac.uk/id/eprint/6160

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