Hyper-connectivity : intricacies of national and international cyber securities

Dawson, Maurice (2017) Hyper-connectivity : intricacies of national and international cyber securities. Doctoral thesis, London Metropolitan University.

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Abstract

This thesis examined the three core themes: the role of education in cyber security, the role of technology in cyber security, and the role of policy in cyber security, the areas in which the papers are published. The associated works are published in referred journals, peer reviewed book chapters, and conference proceedings. Research can be found in the following outlets: 1. Security Solutions for Hyperconnectivity and the Internet of Things; 2. Developing Next-Generation Countermeasures for Homeland Security Threat Prevention; 3. New Threats and Countermeasures in Digital Crime and Cyber Terrorism; 4. International Journal of Business Continuity and Risk Management; 5. Handbook of Research on 3-D Virtual Environments and Hypermedia for Ubiquitous Learning; 6. Information Security in Diverse Computing Environments; 7. Technology, Innovation, and Enterprise Transformation; 8. Journal of Information Systems Technology and Planning; 9. Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology. The shortcomings and gaps in cyber security research is the research focus on hyperconnectivity of people and technology to include the policies that provide the standards for security hardened systems. Prior research on cyber and homeland security reviewed the three core themes separately rather than jointly. This study examined the research gaps within cyber security as it relates to core themes in an effort to develop stronger policies, education programs, and hardened technologies for cyber security use. This work illustrates how cyber security can be broken into these three core areas and used together to address issues such as developing training environments for teaching real cyber security events. It will further show the correlations between technologies and policies for system Certification & Accreditation (C&A). Finally, it will offer insights on how cyber security can be used to maintain security for international and national security. The overall results of the study provide guidance on how to create an ubiquitous learning (U-Learning) environment to teach cyber security concepts, craft polices that affect secure computing, and examines the effects on national and international security. The overall research has been improving the role of cyber security in education, technology, and policy.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Additional Information: uk.bl.ethos.727504
Uncontrolled Keywords: cyber security; cyber securities; hyperconnectivity; hyper-connectivity; Internet of Things; Ubiquitous Learning (U-Learning); digital crime; cyber terrorism
Subjects: 000 Computer science, information & general works
Department: School of Computing and Digital Media
Depositing User: Mary Burslem
Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2017 11:21
Last Modified: 15 Dec 2017 12:27
URI: http://repository.londonmet.ac.uk/id/eprint/1282

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